Music

Miron ‘Too Deep’

Singer/songwriter Miron is back with his latest single, an ambient and relaxing track titled “Too Deep,” set for release on March 28th. The track, led by guitar and synthesizers, delves into the concept of romantic self-presentation. In his own words, Miron describes the track as an exploration of, “who are we when we are alone, and who are we when we are around someone we love or someone we want to be loved by.” While the vocals are smooth and soulful, not unlike Lana Del Rey, acoustic sensibilities echo inspiration from contemporary country acts like Chris Stapleton. The third verse allows space for the power behind Miron’s vocals as he belts, “I don’t know if I love you, or just tryna figure you out.” 

Based in Paris, with roots in Macedonia and time lived in Spain, Miron is an artist with a genre as enigmatic as his life – and musical career. After years of instrumental and vocal lessons, along with stints on the stage, he has honed his artistry to sit comfortably between various styles of rock – without sacrificing his talent as a songwriter. Former press highlights for past releases (“With Your Eyes” and “Plague,” which have 73k and 144k plays on Spotify alone, respectively) include recognition Endsessions and RocknBirra, playlist spots on Rock FM 500 2023, Rock Anos 2000, ROCK MUSIC, The Best of Rock, Alternative & Rock Hits!, and exposure on French Radio. 

“Too Deep” was conceptualized after canceled plans made way for acoustic guitar reflections and idealizing love. Miron believes that listeners can pick up on these emotions in the melancholy melodies of the track. “It seems like getting to know someone has become like playing chess,” he shares. “Everyone calculates their moves, protects their feelings and themselves and there has to be a winner and loser. And usually the ones willing to open up are the losers. That’s what I was thinking and singing about.”

Miron’s powerful presence and sharpened style elevate his commercial appeal. His raw vocals are always at the forefront, with their abundant versatility. He can sing slow and suave, but he can also scream his lungs out. Though his career is singular in display, his work can traverse sounds due to his myriad of lived experiences and the stories he has to share with listeners.