Music

Moonkay ‘Sisyphus’

Moonkay is the work of innovative artist, producer and vocalist Jordan Barritt. He has formed together a unique blend of different styles and genres that surround his ears on a daily basis, creating atmospheric electronic music with a subtle slice of alternative R&B. The result is something hugely potent and individual, and his richly textured music has reached far and wide with his releases to date.

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A trio of albums to his name already, Moonkay is consistently producing and pushing the boundaries of his sound, further exemplified by his latest single ‘Sisyphus’. An emotive and heartfelt delivery which is packed full of experimental samples and airy synths, before Barritt’s deep and powerful vocal enters the fore. Passion is encapsulated in what is a song all about the break of a relationship and falling into what feels like a never ending spiral. Moonkay symbolises this brilliantly and the self doubts he had in his mind are portrayed through his swooning lyricism.

The music itself does lend itself to the contemporary bedroom pop sphere, and the song changes mood on multiple occasions; introduced by a soft cloud of synths and female vocals, followed by his spoken word vocal reminiscent of the great Ghostpoet. The haunting lyric ‘lost souls, lost cause, give me energy, when I’ve lost hope’ captivates the middle section of the song, before the tracks transcends into a dark and up tempo synth-driven beat, with Barritt now showcasing his singing ability too.

Sisyphus’ then eventually softens and fades out with a catchy and melodically flowing call and response, making this a song that will intrigue and interest you from that first instance. Moonkay has taken the genre of bedroom pop to a whole new level, showing that there really are limitless capabilities with his craft.

Speaking on the meaning behind ‘Sisyphus’, Moonkay explains:

“Sisyphus focuses on the emotions I went through following a break with my partner, and the mix of internal questioning, confusion and ignorance that followed.”